tallerandblueonline:

carolinecurrie:

Too good not to re-blog. 

Blogging it again, to remind myself to keep attempting to draw.  Even if the results still make me cringe and bring back various “U SUK” comments.

I haven’t read these all, but I figure I’ll come back to them and really get what it’s attempting to say. /Shrug - we could all use some motivation sometimes, perhaps I’ll end up sleeping less and actually get something done, perhaps even improve upon something.

bouncingdodecahedrons:

angwe:

nevver:

Two Mindsets

Any teacher can tell you this. This is why it is important to praise students for the work they put into something. You, as a teacher, can influence this mindset.
Take, for example, two apparently similar bits of praise:
“Wow, that’s great. You’re really good at this.”
Versus
“Wow, that’s great. You’ve worked really hard on this.”
It would seem, to the casual observer, that the first is a “self-esteem booster” while the second is just a “motivational booster”.
The problem is that the first type of praise contributes to a mindset that people either “get it” or they don’t; they’re “smart” or they’re not; nothing can be done to change that. (This is what the infographic is calling a fixed mindset. Educators usually call it an inherent intelligence mindset.)
The second type of praise still indicates that the student might, in fact, be good at it, but it also reinforces the idea that hard work and effort makes it possible to learn and develop. It also works in a social-cognitive mode to reinforce this idea to the other students. (The infographic has this labeled as the growth mindset. It’s usually referred to as a developmental intelligence model in education texts.)
While it is true that some of this is part of the student’s own frame of mind, a lot of it can be influenced by the pedagogical methods of the teacher.

I don’t know if I’m the right or the left one… I certainly display some of the left qualities.

I like how angwe put it. I think that the top comment is more common, at least it has been for me. If someone is smart or creative or something from the get-go it implies that they didn’t need to work as hard as others had to, which might belittle their effort and discourage others from attempting to be as creative or knowledgeable because they just don’t have that “gift” or whatnot.
I must say that I have quite a few of the left qualities - which I should likely work on changing perhaps…

bouncingdodecahedrons:

angwe:

nevver:

Two Mindsets

Any teacher can tell you this. This is why it is important to praise students for the work they put into something. You, as a teacher, can influence this mindset.

Take, for example, two apparently similar bits of praise:

“Wow, that’s great. You’re really good at this.”

Versus

“Wow, that’s great. You’ve worked really hard on this.”

It would seem, to the casual observer, that the first is a “self-esteem booster” while the second is just a “motivational booster”.

The problem is that the first type of praise contributes to a mindset that people either “get it” or they don’t; they’re “smart” or they’re not; nothing can be done to change that. (This is what the infographic is calling a fixed mindset. Educators usually call it an inherent intelligence mindset.)

The second type of praise still indicates that the student might, in fact, be good at it, but it also reinforces the idea that hard work and effort makes it possible to learn and develop. It also works in a social-cognitive mode to reinforce this idea to the other students. (The infographic has this labeled as the growth mindset. It’s usually referred to as a developmental intelligence model in education texts.)

While it is true that some of this is part of the student’s own frame of mind, a lot of it can be influenced by the pedagogical methods of the teacher.

I don’t know if I’m the right or the left one… I certainly display some of the left qualities.

I like how angwe put it. I think that the top comment is more common, at least it has been for me. If someone is smart or creative or something from the get-go it implies that they didn’t need to work as hard as others had to, which might belittle their effort and discourage others from attempting to be as creative or knowledgeable because they just don’t have that “gift” or whatnot.

I must say that I have quite a few of the left qualities - which I should likely work on changing perhaps…

guys i find attractive

  • famous
  • taken
  • twice my age
  • not real
  • dead
  • gay
  • power crazy Asgard God
"Female toplessness is legal in a lot of places in the US (although not where I live), and I’d be meeting the letter of the law with a couple of Band-aids. But I have a gut feeling that if I go anywhere that there are people—and particularly anywhere there are children—nobody’s going to be too happy about my Band-aids. The enforcement is social; women just don’t go around topless in the US.

It bothers me because it’s unequal, but it also bothers me in its implications: that my body is inherently sexual, and a man’s body isn’t. It feels like men are being viewed through the first-person lens of “it’s nice to feel the sun on my skin, and I don’t mean anything by it” and women are being viewed through the distinctly third-person lens of “it’s inappropriate for me, a heterosexual man, to see her sexy parts.” It ignores the experiences of people who are turned on by male chests and somehow manage to contain themselves when they see one."

The Pervocracy: My boobs want to be free. (via sexisnottheenemy)

truuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuue

(via discontented-delight)

omg that last sentence is so perfect

(via ftmfeminist)

Yeah, aolenalghdkljab I don’t know what to add because this sorta just sums it up. “yeah, you can go around topless, too.” but when you do everyone is telling you to put on some clothes and shielding their children’s eyes and avoiding you. I’m not trying to cause a row, and I’m not trying to get anyone to notice but they do because it’s so unusual to see a woman uncovered apparently. I, however, see plenty of men walking around topless all the time and no one shields their children or gets offended. Men and women are both built pretty nearly the same :|

foervraengd:

Livestreaming!
Doing some light study!

foervraengd:

Livestreaming!

Doing some light study!

So, I’ve gotten off work and have the weekend off.

Time to catch up on my news, namely NASA - what’re they up to? Technology, science, oh! maybe some archeology or paleontology, perhaps we’ll add a bit of politics or other world events in there too. 

Hmm, I don’t know what else needs catching up on - any suggestions?

Ah, yes. Art - I must study anatomy and that sorta thing too. There are just too many things that need knowing.

So, I know No. 6 is apparently shonen-ai and Nezumi and Shion are a pair. That is entirely awesome, and I have few qualms. However, I’m not a yaoi kind of girl and when I first watched the anime I didn’t ship them, though they shared two kisses. I just thought the bond they had was different than that. 

For me, it’s a little difficult to equate sex with a strong bond, well, no that’s not right. I see bonds that lack sexual intimacy as stronger because they do not like one another based on the pleasure they get from being around them. Well, they might, but I also think that trust and devotion are incredible factors (like between Frodo and Sam in Lord of the Rings, or Legolas and Gimli, and others I can’t remember).
I like those types of relationships, but that might just be because I’m not a very sexual person right now.
Either way, I didn’t ship the pair even though they’re cute - I saw their relationship differently is all :)

So, I know No. 6 is apparently shonen-ai and Nezumi and Shion are a pair. That is entirely awesome, and I have few qualms. However, I’m not a yaoi kind of girl and when I first watched the anime I didn’t ship them, though they shared two kisses. I just thought the bond they had was different than that. 

For me, it’s a little difficult to equate sex with a strong bond, well, no that’s not right. I see bonds that lack sexual intimacy as stronger because they do not like one another based on the pleasure they get from being around them. Well, they might, but I also think that trust and devotion are incredible factors (like between Frodo and Sam in Lord of the Rings, or Legolas and Gimli, and others I can’t remember).

I like those types of relationships, but that might just be because I’m not a very sexual person right now.

Either way, I didn’t ship the pair even though they’re cute - I saw their relationship differently is all :)

jamtastik:

anomaly1:

Marketing done right

dope.

cozydark:

Organics Probably Formed Easily in Early Solar System |
Complex organic compounds, including many important to life on Earth, were readily produced under conditions that likely prevailed in the primordial solar system. Scientists at the University of Chicago and NASA Ames Research Center came to this conclusion after linking computer simulations to laboratory experiments.
Fred Ciesla, assistant professor in geophysical sciences at UChicago, simulated the dynamics of the solar nebula, the cloud of gas and dust from which the sun and the planets formed. Although every dust particle within the nebula behaved differently, they all experienced the conditions needed for organics to form over a simulated million-year period.
“Whenever you make a new planetary system, these kinds of things should go on,” said Scott Sandford, a space science researcher at NASA Ames. “This potential to make organics and then dump them on the surfaces of any planet you make is probably a universal process.” continue reading

cozydark:

Organics Probably Formed Easily in Early Solar System |

Complex organic compounds, including many important to life on Earth, were readily produced under conditions that likely prevailed in the primordial solar system. Scientists at the University of Chicago and NASA Ames Research Center came to this conclusion after linking computer simulations to laboratory experiments.

Fred Ciesla, assistant professor in geophysical sciences at UChicago, simulated the dynamics of the solar nebula, the cloud of gas and dust from which the sun and the planets formed. Although every dust particle within the nebula behaved differently, they all experienced the conditions needed for organics to form over a simulated million-year period.

“Whenever you make a new planetary system, these kinds of things should go on,” said Scott Sandford, a space science researcher at NASA Ames. “This potential to make organics and then dump them on the surfaces of any planet you make is probably a universal process.” continue reading

Don’t you just love dreams that are fantastic?

When you wake up and don’t remember your dream, but you know you’ve had one. Then, later in the day, you suddenly remember? 

I had a dream that I was watching a woman who had befriended two killer whales, she was swimming with them in the sea. Like nearly all dreams, it had an air of impossibility about it; the woman could swim just as fast as the orcas - and they knew she needed air. So she’d grab their fins and they would jump with her through the roiling seas (or are they in the oceans?). Then I turned into her, and it was slightly frightening, having to hold your breath at just the right moment to avoid drowning. But exhilarating. 

There were also some medieval people who wanted her dead, for some reason. It was much more interesting than I’m making it out to be. Then again, aren’t dreams always? If only one could go back and experience them again at will, but then that might destroy the awesomeness of it all.

Anyway, have a wonderful rest of the day followers :) I’ve got spring break starting tomorrow, so I might be away from the keyboard this weekend - I’m going to drive somewhere with my sisters and pups.